Pursuing: The Second Word of Freedom

God is guiding us out of the land of slavery into a place of freedom and love. This is what the 10 Commandments are for: They lead us to freedom.

Second Word

You shall not make for yourself an image in the form of anything in heaven above or on the earth beneath or in the waters below. (Ex. 20:4).

Some say…

Some say this word is just another command about worshipping God. Because God is invisible, without form, that God cannot be faithfully worship through an image.  It is impossible to represent God through a tangible image so any creation of visible image is idolatry. 

But what if…

But what if this second word is not primarily about banning unfaithful worship (though it is certainly about that)? What if this word is pointing us toward a dynamic and interactive relationship with God?

Interactive with God is an open-ended relationship. In this relationship we must pursue God as much as God is pursuing us. An image or idol of God—and of the other gods—is static and mute.  But God reveals himself as dynamic and vocal, continually acting with and speaking to his people.


Ever wonder “I know God loves me, but does God even LIKE me?” If so I’d love to give you something the good news of God with us.?


Word of Life: PURSUING

We must resist boxing God in to some preset conceptions or replacing God with a static (but easy to approach) idol. God is jealous for a relationship with us, and God knows we can be lazy and complacent. And an image or idol of any kind would just make it that much more difficult for us to pursue God.

Loving God exclusively—the first word—means loving God intentionally—second word.

Will we pursue God as much as God is pursuing us?

Loving: The First Word of Freedom

God is guiding us out of the land of slavery into a place of freedom and love. This is what the 10 Commandments are for: They lead us to freedom.

First Word:

“You shall have no other gods before me” (Ex. 20:3).

Some say…

Some say this word is focused on worship and rebellion. We are only to worship God. But in our rebellion we worship others gods, or ourselves. It’s said that because God redeemed Israel God has a special right and authority over Israel, and to protect this authority God demands exclusive allegiance. In this view God is over Israel, demands worship, and expects obedience. Many emphasize that God is Israel’s new master, lord, and ruler.

But what if…

But what if this first word—“word” as a way of life not merely a “commandment” to be obeyed—is about freedom and love?

God knows that to look to other gods (to have other god’s before God) IS TO RETURN to slavery and death.  God reminds them the verse before, “I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of Egypt, out of the land of slavery” (Ex. 20:2). God doesn’t want us to return to slavery and death, and that’s what this word is protecting against.

Word of Life: LOVING

Where is the word directing us? How is this word guiding us?

The positive side of this word is to “Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength” (Deut. 6:5).  Loving God opens us to God’s ways of connecting with God’s world, of relating to God’s people, of working for God’s justice and righteousness.  Having other gods closes us off from these ways.

Turning to other gods—to other authorities, other powers, other pursuits of happiness and pleasure, other paths for protecting ourselves or finding purpose or seeking provision—turning to these will away lead toward the death of community and relationship.

But being devoting to God, LOVING God exclusively train us into the freedom to love others exceptionally.  Or better, we learn to love others gratuitously.

Does God Have to Love Me?

Something surprising happens in a wedding ceremony. The bride and groom, after great preparation and full of love for each other, step forward to be united in marriage. And at the climax of that ceremony, they put conditions on their love for each other.

 These conditions are exchanged as vows. These vows take the unconditional love of the bride and the groom and make it practical. How will the bride and groom love each other? For better or for worse, for richer or poorer, in sickness and health. These promises—though often broken in our age—reveal that true love is as practical as it is emotional. The love between the bride and groom is not unconditional, but there are conditions about how love will be expressed between them.

The pastor who married my wife and I told us: “You married each other because of your love. Now you must love each other because you are married.” The time for emotional love was passed. The hard work of love had now begun. It was something we had to do.

Love the Lord Your God

But can love really be promised? Can we be commanded to love? Isn’t obligatory love the antithesis of unconditional love? Shouldn’t love be without expectations, without strings attached, without any requirement of reciprocity or—as it were—commandments? After all, we often see God offering us this unconditional love, a love that offers us everything, death for our life. This unconditional love, we often think, calls for faith in response—our faith in God’s love.

But this view of God’s unconditional love is really just sentimental love writ large, a view of God’s love that inspires faith in God’s love, perhaps more than it inspires faith in God himself.

Love is not something that we feel or that happens to us. The central command of the Old Testament is to “love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength” (Deut. 6:5). And Jesus affirmed this commandment as the first and greatest (Matt. 22:36–40).

Do these commands attach strings to God’s love? No. But they do show us its covenantal nature—a love based in promises that guide a relationship. Covenantal love does not fit easily into our cultural understanding of unconditional or sentimental love, but when we understand how God loves us and calls us in this love, we will better understand how to love others.

Covenantal Love

In The Love of God, Jewish theologian Jon Levenson notes the graciousness of God’s covenantal love, first given to Abraham, then re-affirmed toward Israel. Without merit or reason, God calls Abraham and bestows on him the original blessing that Adam had lost (Gen. 12:1–4). Years later Moses reminds the children of Abraham that it was “not because you were more numerous than any other people that the Lord set his heart on you and chose you—for you were the fewest of all peoples. It was because the Lord loved you…” that God chose them and rescued them from Egypt (Deut. 7:7–8).

God’s covenantal love, then, is unconditional in its source. Like a geyser of perfect grace, God’s love pours out toward Israel. But God has also ordered and shaped this life-giving spring by giving Israel the law through Moses.

Levenson reminds us that, “graciousness does not mean formlessness, and if love is to be a relationship and not just an ephemeral and episodic sentiment, it must impose norms of its own.” The norms of love between God and Israel are spelled out in the law given through Moses. These laws represent “the dynamics of covenantal love—not law as the antithesis of love, or love as a substitute for law, but love made practical, reliable, reciprocal, and socially responsible.” The law channels the unconditional eruption of God’s love within the riverbanks of an on-going relationship.

The offer of love is unconditional, but the mutual relationship of love has conditions—or better, expectations. As Levenson notes, “love may originate as ‘sheer gratuity,’ but unless it is to be chaotic and endlessly frustrating, it must also harbor moral expectations within it.” These expectations affirm the mutual standing of both partners in the relationship and offer guidance on how to make love practical.

To Abraham, God pours out the gratuity of love. To Moses, God sets the conditionality of love. Both express God’s covenantal love. God’s unconditional love is not license to do whatever we want. And God placing expectations on us does not mean God is harsh, demanding, and loveless. It just means God wants a relationship with us and knows what it means to have one.

Love Made Practical

It is sometimes thought that women understand love as an emotion while men see it as an action. For some, the idea that love must be made practical could seem like a particularly masculine way of understanding love. But as a pastor for over 15 years I’ve seen that whenever a relationship is in crisis, the offended party—whether male or female—has little time for words or sentiment. They want to see love in action. “Show me you are really working through your addiction recovery.” “Show me how you will build trust after your infidelity.”

These are not unreasonable demands. They convey a longing for love to be made practical, even when forgiveness has been offered. This does not mean love is being withheld until the proper conditions are met, but that relationships must be continually maintained and negotiated within the space of unconditional love.

Even in the healthiest relationships love must be made practical. This Valentine’s Day, along with that card expressing your ending love and affection, maybe your Valentine’s Day date could culminate in vows. Create a list of five things you could start doing regularly to show your love. And since love includes non-romantic relationship, ask your kids, co-workers, and friends for a list. In this way we will fulfill the first and second greatest commands, to love God and our neighbors (Matt. 22:36–40).

(First published on Christianity Today)

1 Thing We About Faith We Often Forget: Faith Hacking #4

We constantly stumble over the word—faith. How do we know we have it? What does it mean to lose it?

But really, faith is weirder than we think. And there is one thing we often misunderstand about faith.

We are almost done with our Faith Hacking series. Previously we covered…

  1. Making room for the God who comes.
  2. Understanding that the gospel who is a person.
  3. Discovering that salvation is entrance into a new family.

Now it’s time to tackle the idea of faith.

So, what is the one thing we forget about faith?

What Faith is Not

In my teaching and preaching I often define a word by what it isn’t.

Faith is not

  • An Idea: not just something we think about.
  • An Emotion not just something we feel.

Faith is not an intellectual or emotional state. It is not what we think about God. It is not believing God exists. It is not what we feel about God, that we sense God loves us in our hearts—or that we don’t.

Ideas and emotions aren’t bad. I affirm God existence. And I think it would be a good idea for you to affirm it also.  I affirm the love of God. And I would love for you to feel the comfort and acceptance of God too.

But when we say faith, that is not what the Bible generally means.

Faith is much more robust than merely an idea or an emotion.

Faith is Allegiance?

Faith—in the ancient world, which includes the Bible—meant something much closer to allegiance or loyalty.

But loyalty and allegiance are weird words—they have a bad wrap these day.

Allegiance is something we probably don’t think much about. Except something like “I pledge allegiance to…”

And loyalty—especially when it is demanded—seems manipulative and controlling.

Isn’t it just military dictators or tyrants who demand loyalty?  Don’t cult leaders who demand total allegiance?  Isn’t it just Darth Vader and the evil Emperor who demand unthinking loyalty and allegiance?

Faith in the Bible

But faith as loyalty or allegiance is very common in the Bible.

In the Old Testament God repeatedly tells Israel not to look to Egypt or Babylon for help against their enemies.  God is supposed to be Israel’s help in times of trouble.

Israel is supposed to have faith in God.  Their allegiance is with God, not Egypt. Their loyalty is with God, not Babylon.

 

And what does that mean practically?

It means Israel’s help comes from the LORD, not Babylon. Their deliverance comes from God, not the horses and chariots of the Egyptian war machine.

 

Faith answers these basic questions:

  • Who do you look to for help, assistance, or deliverance? That is the one you have faith in.
  • Who do you call on in times of trouble? That is where your allegiance and loyalty today.
  • Who do you call on for reinforcements? That is where your loyalty is.

Life is War Zone

You see, our lives are not so much a calm place where God wonders about our thoughts and feeling about whether God exists.

ACTUALLY, life is a war zone full of hazards and dangers, full of spiritual forces out to destroy us, AND WE ARE DYING OUT HERE.

And God promises to rescue us. And God IS rescuing us,  leading us to safety, to salvation.  And the way out of this war zone is to stay close to Jesus, to stay on narrow path that leads to life.

And the question is, Will you give your trust, your allegiance, your loyalty to God, to the one getting us through this?

Or will you, when trials and suffering and sorrows come, will you abandon him for something else. Will you put your trust and loyalty somewhere else?

Faith Hack: Allegiance to God

In this war zone of life, the genuineness of your faith going to be tested. Will you stay loyal to Jesus or not?

Jesus has the power to save us. Jesus is willing to protect us. Jesus is leading us to life in a new family. Will be given him our allegiance?

Will we trust him?
Will we cling to him?
Will we call to God for help?
Will we place our faith in God?

How would your relationship to God change knowing that faith is not a feeling or an idea?

How would your faith as loyalty and allegiance change how you perceive the ups and downs of life? What is God calling you to right now?

Don’t miss the last “faith hack” on holiness coming out the next couple of days (the first three were on God, the gospel, and salvation). Subscribe and receive a free gift about how God’s glory is intimately connected to God’s love for us.


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Is Your Gospel Holding You Back? Faith Hacking #2

Why Still So Tired?

For all the weary and over-burdened, we were told that if we followed Jesus then his “yoke would be easy and his burden would be light” (Matt. 11:28-30).

But often times we don’t feel that way.

We haven’t found that kind of rest in Jesus. We feel still feel disconnected, tired, and stuck. We feel overwhelmed, lost, and forgotten.

We believe in the gospel, but the peace and joy has worn off.

A Problem with the Gospel?

It is easy to believe this is just the nature of things.  Eventually the vibrancy of faith fades and the urgency of hope dissipates.

People tell us to embrace a childlike faith, but often we feel the need to grow up and take an honest look at life.

But what if our problem wasn’t with our faith, or with Jesus?
What if our gospel is holding us back? 

The gospel can hold us back if we only hear part of the gospel.  This can happen in two ways. We can either hear about the “gospel of salvation” or the “gospel of the kingdom.”

Only a Gospel of Salvation?

The “gospel of salvation” focuses on individual sin.  This gospel looks back to the cross as the place that God forgives our sins.  And this gospel looks forward to heaven as the reward for believing in Jesus.  And both of those things are good news.

But too often the “gospel of salvation” leaves us wondering how we are supposed to live right now.  What should I be doing with my life right now? How do I find meaning and purpose right now if the goal of everything is just life in heaven in the future?

But in the meantime people give us a list of things to do (evangelize others, serve in the church, minister to the outcast).  And all those activities are good things. But too often they can feel like another burden to bare, another law to keep.

It is easy to be discouraged, wondering how to make sense of the “peace and rest” that Jesus promised but now feels so elusive.

Only a Gospel of the Kingdom?

But maybe some of us focus more on the “gospel of the Kingdom.”  This focuses on the here and now.  God is on mission to transform the world, and we are called into this work.  This perspective looks more to the resurrection of Jesus as the place where new creation springs forth.  And of course this also is good news for us.

But too often focusing on our work to bring God’s kingdom to earth can burn us out.  We can feel that every burden of the world, every injustice against the innocent, every evil  action, is somehow our responsibility to fix.

No wonder we feel overwhelmed and burned out.  No one could ever carry that load.

The Gospel of God with Us

But the good new is that the gospel IS NOT primarily a plan for our personal salvation.  The gospel IS NOT primarily a plan for God’s kingdom come.

The gospel is not a plan at all. The gospel is a PERSON.

For the gospel is Jesus Christ himself, God become human—in order to dwell with us, in order to be with us.

4 Ways We Know The Gospel is a Person

  • The Apostle Paul describes the essence of gospel in terms of the person of Jesus (not a plan for salvation or God’s kingdom come).  He does this in 1 Cor. 15:1-5 where he describes not a plan of salvation, but the live of the person Jesus.

Now I make known to you, brethren, the gospel which I [gospeled] to you, which also you received, in which also you stand, by which also you are saved, if you hold fast the word which I preached to you, unless you believed in vain.

For I delivered to you as of first importance what I also received, that Christ died for our sins according to the Scriptures, and that He was buried, and that He was raised on the third day according to the Scriptures, and that He appeared to Cephas, then to the twelve.

 

  • The Gospel of Matthew has the bookends of “God with us.”  At the beginning an angel tells Joseph that the son Mary will bear will be called “Emmanuel”, or “God with us” (Matt. 1:23).  At the end Jesus himself say,  “Behold, I am always with you, even to the end of the age” (Matt. 28:20).

 

  • The Gospel of John begins by telling us that the Word of God (John 1:1) took on flesh and lived—or dwelt— among us (John 1:14).   The idea of God dwelling with humanity echoes the Old Testament Tabernacle which was made so that God could live with his people.

 

  • Lastly, all the books in the Bible that tell the story of Jesus are called “gospels”.  This is because the early church understood that the entire life, death, and resurrection of Jesus was the good news of God for them.

The person who is Jesus is the good news, the gospel of God.

Faith Hack: The Gospel of God with you

Can we hack our understanding of the gospel?

Can we move our understanding away from a “plan” that accidentally leaves us as burdened, tired, and restless as ever?

Can we move toward the gospel as the good news that a person, the very person of God, has come to us, to be with us.

Can we place the good news of salvation and the good news of God’s kingdom come within the person of Jesus who comes to us?

How would your life of faith be different if you focused on Jesus who IS THE GOSPEL? What would be different right now, no matter what is happening in your life, to believe that the good news is that God is with you?

 

Don’t miss the other 4 “faith hacks” coming out the next couple of days (the first one is here). Subscribe and receive a free gift about how God’s glory doesn’t mean God hates us.


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Haunted House or War Zone: Does God Test Our Faith?

Now that we are saved, why aren’t things awesome all the time?  Why isn’t life one continuous ascent into the perfect life with God?

And why are we told that God is testing us?

As 1 Peter 1:6 says,

In this [salvation] you rejoice, even if now for a little while you have had to suffer various trials, so that the genuineness of your faith…may be found to result in praise and glory and honor when Jesus Christ is revealed.

Why would God test faith like that?

Answering this question properly all depends on how we image these tests. It depends on whether we think of life as in a haunted house or a war zone.

Is God Scaring us or Leading Us?

Ready to Jump Out

Our youngest son loves to scare people when they enter the house.  He will hide behind a doorway or some furniture, lying in wait.  And then he pounces. Sometimes he scares us. Sometimes not. Sometimes we see him getting into place. Sometimes we don’t.

It’s in all good fun.

Except when we think of God acting like this?

Sometimes we image our Christian lives as if God is lying in wait, ready to spring out and test us. We think that God is actively testing us, laying out traps to see if we will fall away or lose our faith.

Sometimes we think God is testing us to see if we really, Really, REALLY believe.  And if we fail the test then God is going to…well, who knows what will happen.

The Haunted House of Faith

Sometimes we can image our life of faith like a haunted house.  God is actively trying to scare us, jumping out unexpectedly and tripping us up.

But—as the idea goes—if we can get through without freaking out too much then we will be saved.   If we prove to God that we won’t doubt or run away then we will be saved.

But his image of God actively testing us is horrible—and inaccurate. This view of God lurking behind doors to test us distorts who really God is and how God is accomplishing salvation for us.

Ready to Rescue

Life is not an artificially created haunted house where we need to steel our nerves against any surprises.

Rather, life is better thought as a war zone.

We live in a war zone full of hazards and dangers.  And it is filled roaming spiritual forces seeking to destroy us.

But God, in Jesus through the power of the Holy Spirit, has promised to rescue us from this war zone.  Not only is this promised, but God IS rescuing us and saving us as the one who has come to us and is leading us to safety.

And the only way out of this war zone is to stay close to Jesus, to stay on the straight and narrow path that will leads to life.

The Loyalty in the War Zone

And the question is this, Will you give your trust, your allegiance, your loyalty to Jesus who is rescuing us, who leading us through this war zone?

Or will you, when trials and suffering and sorrows come, will you abandon him for something else? Will you put your trust and loyalty somewhere else when the attack comes?

In this war zone of life, the genuineness of our faith will be tested. But not because God is creating ways to scare us. But because this war zone is already scary enough, and we have continual opportunities to break loyalty with Jesus.

Jesus has the power to save and rescue us. And Jesus is willing to protect us. Jesus is leading us to life.  Will we trust him? Will we place our faith in him?

The Testing of Faith

God is not testing our faith.
But our faith will be tested.

Our faith–allegiance in Jesus is the beginning of our rescue. And our faith–allegiance to Jesus will lead us safely home.

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Love without thinking?

Think before you act.

Don’t just act. Don’t just react.
Slow down, think it through, reflect and plan.

We are all told this.  It’s what I tell me kids.

But is this right?

Thought wastes time. It’s dangerous.

Thought takes time.  And it takes energy.  The more you think the more blood your brain needs, and the more calories you burn.  That’s why you feel tired when you think too much.

And thought is literally dangerous (not figuratively).

At the dawn of humanity, to think instead of react means you’ll miss your meal. To think instead of react is to become a meal!

Acting is survival. Thinking is leisure.
Acting is necessary. Thinking is optional.

Trust Your Training

Athletes and the military constantly practice and train.  Practicing repetitive movements programs their bodies—and minds—to act automatically. They act without reflection or hesitation.

They train so that in every situation they are not thinking, but only reacting.

“Trust your training” is a motto for both athletics and the military. Trust your repetitive actions.  Don’t think about it!  When things get intense, don’t think about winning or losing, living or dying.

Just execute your training.
Act automatically.

Can Love Become Automatic?

Can love become automatic?
Can mercy become unconscious?
Can grace become unthinking?

Love seems the opposite of our natural instincts. Love seems opposed to our programmed prejudices.  All our mental short cuts—all those unthinking thoughts that speed us through the day, from surviving as a hunter-gatherer to succeeding as a city dweller—seem to work against the deep and profound call of love.

But, on the other hand, if other activities can become unconscious and unthinking through practice, why can’t love be without thinking?

With practice we can use thought, focus, intention, and intensity to train our brains and our bodies to love unconsciously, to love unconditionally.

Love takes practice

As pastor Juliet Waite preached on Sunday at Life on the Vine, surrendering to God’s love is not passive.

Surrendering to God’s love takes work. It takes practice. It takes focused effort and intention.

And with that training, the training to surrender to God’s love, comes the ability to love automatically, to love without thinking.

Love without thinking

To love without thinking is to care for one without considering the cost to oneself.

To love without thinking is to stand for justice without wondering how it will effect you.

To love without thinking is to offer yourself without calculating a return on investment.

To love without thinking is probably as close to loving unconditionally as we will ever get.


(This post it is part of my “20 for 20” post where I write for twenty minutes a day for twenty days.  So these are quick thoughts as I push out my ideas and practice writing.  See my explanation here.)

The poor you will always have with you.

jesus-whipping-bankers

For the poor you will always have with you, and you can show kindness to them whenever you wish:
but you will not always have me. (Mark 14:7) 

From crude realism to hopeless resignation, this quote from Jesus is confusing at best and disheartening at worst.

What? So poverty and inequality are just a fact of life?  Things really aren’t going to change?  In Kingdom of God is really so ineffectual?

But Nicholas Perrin has helped me see a different perspective on this saying that revolutionized how I read it and how we should see the vocation of the church (in his excellent Jesus the Temple).

Counter-Temple Movement

Perrin understands Jesus and his movement as a “counter-temple movement”, and by counter-temple he doesn’t mean against the temple all together, but against the current sinful administration of the temple.  Jesus is against the temple as it is because it isn’t participating in and pointing toward the true eschatological temple to come (Ez. 37:26-27).  Jesus was seeking to establish a true and living temple centered on himself and his movement outside the jurisdiction of the current temple establishment (just think of the temple sayings and activities of Jesus and the temple imagery applied to the early church… I’ll post on this more latter).

In light of this, part of what it would mean to establish the true temple would be to instituted the jubilee practice of forgiving debts (Deut. 15:7-15; Lev. 25), an action that was supposed to be regulated by the priests through the temple treasury, which rarely, if ever, happened.

Jesus and his movement, through living with and as the poor, and as those who attempted to be a clearinghouse for the redistribution of wealth, was in fact functioning like the temple as it was supposed to.

“The Poor You Will Always Have With You”

So when Jesus says, “The poor you will always have with you” he isn’t making a broad social observation about the current and future state of the world, certainly not one based in crude realism (as if he were saying, “There just is and always will be poverty in the world.”)  Rather, he is naming part of the inherent calling and purpose of his movement: “You will always have the poor with you because you will be the place that poverty is being overcome through the alternative economy of grace as the new temple”. 

Jesus is really naming a vocation for the church, not a reality in the world.

The church will have the poor because part of being the church is being with the poor.  If the church is not with and among the poor it is in danger of encountering the prophetic critique of Jesus himself through his Spirit, the same critiques he directed toward the temple establishment of his time.

The Work is With

This could mean all sorts of things for a local congregation: working in homeless shelters, educational programs, debt relief, or other practices of living an alternative, Kingdom-economy.

But we must remember this vocation is not just for the poor, it is with the poor.  This is not a vocation from a distance, but a work that is with the people.

Is your local church with the poor in some tangible way that makes sense in your community? If not, then perhaps you are not being built into the temple of God’s dwelling, a place in which God dwells among the fatherless and the widow, the downtrodden and the poor.

Mastering Objectivity? Or Subject to the Bible

Tim Challies ended a recent post criticizing the practice of Lectio Divina by saying, “This, then, is a danger in Lectio Divina, that it may teach us to approach the text subjectively rather than objectively.”

But what is the big deal about reading the text subjectively as opposed to objectively?

man-inserting-memory-card-in-brain3 Subjects of Scripture

It is a typical concern of those defending expository or expositional preaching that they are seeking “objectivity” in their study as opposed to others who are succumbing mere “subjectivity”, but beyond the concern that such a simple opposition is wildly naïve philosophically and practically, this dichotomy often does the reverse of what it hopes to do (secure the authority of scripture from human manipulation).  

To understand this we need to remember the three ‘subjects’ of Scripture.

1) The subject matter = the text of Scripture.  This is the written word which is often equated with the “Word of God” without further reflection.

2) The subject (as person) = God who spoke and speaks through the text.

The true subject of Scripture, toward which our study ought always to lead, is God, who in Christ through the Spirit, is making all things right.

We read the first (subject matter = Scripture) so that we can encounter, know, and experience, the second (subject/person = God).

And all this leads to the third subject:

3) The subject = the reader, who is made subject, or is subjected to, or subjugated by, the text to God so that as to become slaves to God rather than to our own passions, desires, and deaths.

I believe those advocating for the ‘objectivity’ in study and preaching desire that we would be slaves of the text, and God, rather than masters of the text, but through this opposition of objectivity and subjectivity, which all to often relies on faulty philosophical assumptions, this perspective ends up becoming masters of the text rather than slaves of it.

“Although I wouldn’t have known how to talk about it then, slowly but surely the Scriptures were becoming a place of human striving and intellectual hard work. Somehow, I had fallen into a pattern of using the Scriptures as a tool to accomplish utilitarian purposes rather than experiencing them primarily as a place of intimacy with God for my own soul’s sake.” Ruth Haley Barton, Sacred Rhythms

So perhaps we should stop striving for a mythical “objectivity” through which God will speak to us, and instead embrace all the processes which we might become “subject” to the text, especially the meditative practices that lead to our own subjective un-mastery of God.  Indeed, this is to understand Scripture within the God’s power to save rather than just God’s information to teach.

And tomorrow, on the Missio Alliance Blog, I’ll be posting about why I’m “Against Revelation” because it obscures the power of God behind the desire to know stuff about God. Stay tuned.

And see Mark Moore’s great response to Challies in his “Is Lectio Divina Really Dangerous?

More Than Splitting the Difference: Missio Dei (a)

CHT174193

So often we want to jump right into joining God’s mission because we feel we already know what God’s mission is.  But before even asking, “What is God’s mission?” we need to ask, “Who is this God on mission?” and “How does God go about this mission?”

Is God distant? Is God everywhere? These are the questions for us in this third video of our “More than Splitting the Difference” series as we explore why it is so hard to push beyond this right-left polarity and a “best of both worlds” approach. The hope is to offer a more than “third way” for mission among evangelicals and beyond (and check out Prodigal Christianity for a bit more on what I’m talking about here).

To keep the videos short I split this one up, with the second part coming on Monday (although something happened to speed up the first 10 seconds. Sorry).

And please consider subscribing to the post on the right, or following me on these other streams.

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